Tag Archive | "United Development Systems"

Crisorio to Bring ‘Dealer Beware’ to Texas


AUSTIN, Texas — Randy Crisorio, president and CEO of United Development Systems Inc. (UDS), will deliver the welcome address at the upcoming Texas Compliance Summit, organizers said Wednesday. The event is scheduled for Nov. 16–17, 2015, at the Hilton Austin Airport.

“Anyone who has seen Randy in action will understand why he is the ideal candidate to kick off Compliance Summit,” said David Gesualdo, show chair and publisher of Auto Dealer Today and F&I and Showroom. “He is as dedicated to front-end compliance as he is to dealer development, and he approaches the former with equal parts gravitas and humor.”

Crisorio’s address, “Dealer Beware,” will serve as the starting point for Texas Compliance Summit, which will begin with a reception on the evening of Monday, Nov. 16, and continue with a full slate of featured speakers and panel discussions the next day. Crisorio is expected to discuss the growing influence of regulators on dealer operations and review past actions taken by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and state attorneys general.

“As the automotive dealership compliance culture continues to be shaped by regulatory curveballs, it is critically important that our retailers are informed and up to date on this moving landscape,” Crisorio said. “This is the third Compliance Summit, and as it moves across the country, it continues to pick up speed in interest and attendance as retailers need to know where the guardrails are. Those not in the know may well be in dangerous territory and not know it.”

Registration for Texas Compliance Summit is open at the event’s website. Attendees who register on or before Oct. 26 will enjoy a $100 discount. For sponsorship and exhibition opportunities, contact Eric Gesualdo via email hidden; JavaScript is required or at 727-612-8826.

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United Development Systems, Inc. (UDS) Announces Fernando Romani as Regional Manager


CLEARWATER, Fla.- United Development Systems, Inc. (UDS), a Clearwater, Florida based F&I Performance firm, has announced the addition of Fernando Romani as Regional Manager. Romani will assume responsibilities for UDS Dealer Partners in the South Florida market, with a keen focus on F&I department development with current partners and market share growth through new partner acquisitions. Prior to joining UDS, Romani excelled as the F&I Development Manager for AutoNation and was responsible for the operational efficiency of 33 locations throughout South Florida. He worked closely with the individual store managers to implement F&I processes that consistently moved the needle in a positive direction. “His decades of experience and achievements are exactly what UDS looks for in a representative,” says Randy Crisorio, UDS President and CEO.

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Agent Summit V Wrap Up


To all who attended – thank you for making Agent Summit V the best yet. Since its inception, the number of attendees has increased with each passing year – and with close to 900 attendees, this year was no exception. Agent Summit was launched in 2010 and was designed to provide Independent Agents, who serve as an extension of F&I product providers, with a forum to come together to network, share and learn. Today, many now regard Agent Summit as the one must-attend industry event of the year. This year’s show highlighted the latest training techniques and addressed the newest trends and most pressing challenges that Agents face as they serve their dealer clients.

Attendees were welcomed to the show’s upscale new location at the Venetian Palazzo. Complete with cobblestone streets, footbridges over canals, blue skies, and gondolas, attendees couldn’t help but feel as if they had just stepped off the plane in Venice, Italy. Jaws dropped as Agents who had taken advantage of the Agent Summit room block entered their stunning suites. Words like “lavish” and “spectacular” were heard describing the Palazzo as Agents arriving on Sunday evening gathered for welcoming cocktails.

Much like the Palazzo’s five star reputation, show sessions featured “five star” industry experts with every detail of the show sessions ultimately spelling “Profit!”

The third annual Reinsurance Symposium once again preceded Agent Summit; this year featuring two expert speakers. Greg Petrowski, senior vice president, GPW and Associates Inc., and a veteran speaker at Agent Summit, returned to the stage, and was followed by Brian Feldman, executive vice president, Spencer Re – a seasoned executive who has been a part of just about every facet of the reinsurance space.

With more than 20 years of industry experience each, Petrowski and Feldman shed light on the often confusing benefits of controlled foreign corporations (CFCs) and non-controlled foreign corporations (NCFCs).

At the conclusion of the half-day Reinsurance Symposium, Randy Crisorio, president and CEO, United Development Systems Inc. (UDS), and returning advisory board chair, got the show underway with the official opening address.

This year’s show focused on four major areas, 1) Selling to dealers; 2) Training; 3) Coaching and development; and 4) Technology. Each topic was explored first in an individual feature presentation, and was then followed by a panel session.

Morning presentations featured strategies for closing more business and practical steps for getting in front of dealers. Jimmy Atkinson, COO, AUL Corp, stated, “You have to look at a dealer’s DNA – ‘Dealership Needs Analysis’ so you can provide them with products and solutions to meet those needs. This requires pre-call planning and a targeted presentation.” His mantra for agents was “Be prepared. Be flexible. Be confident.” AE readers can look forward to Atkinson’s further expansion of this topic in an upcoming issue.

Days one and two closed with a cocktail reception in the Expo Hall. Throughout the show, crowds filled the expansive Expo area as agents took advantage of the buffet of networking opportunities. With more than 75 tabletop exhibitors and just shy of a hundred sponsors, the exhibit hall was full to overflowing. Exquisite breakfasts and lunch were served alongside the Expo Hall, thanks to show sponsors.

Known as the “World Greatest Closer,” keynote George Dans jump-started day two out with a bang. Dans was a whirlwind of energy, as he crossed the stage, leaving a flurry of excitement and emotion in his wake. He shared personal stories of both success and failure. In his fast paced, energetic address, Dans got the audience pumped up with a revitalized enthusiasm for closing every single deal. He encouraged attendees to be at the top of their game, “We become what we think about all day. You need to say to yourself, ‘I’m good. I’m gifted. I’m talented. Fear, doubt and worry are behind me.’” Dans urged attendees to step out of their comfort zone and to change their way of thinking so they could come out not just ahead, but at the front of the pack. After his presentation, Dans signed hundreds of copies of his book, Just Close It… Ask and You Shall Receive, which were available to all attendees.

Day two also featured two sessions on training, which emphasized the foundational importance of establishing good relationships in order to get buy in from all parties. The sessions covered themes, frequency, and the needs of retail personnel in service, sales, desking and F&I management.

“As an agency,” stated Ron Reahard, president, Reahard & Associates Inc., “you have to help your F&I managers address the challenges they face on a daily basis, and give them the skills, the knowledge, and the confidence to be successful… Performance doesn’t improve because you or a dealer demands it, it gets better because you put a plan in place to ensure it happens.”

A panelist urged, “Make sure the dealer and GM see you as a partner, and know that you are there to make them better.”

Joe St. John, director of training, Innovative Aftermarket Systems (IAS), and seasoned academic, delivered the feature presentation on coaching and development titled, “Xs and Os – Brain Science for Better Coaching.” This dynamic presentation was definitely an audience favorite. St. John’s unconventional yet proven approach focused on the “why” that drives a customer’s decision to make a purchase. He used a lively combination of humor, experience, and science to demonstrate how to reframe common scenarios for success and forge a unique roadmap for the road to the sale.

The coaching and development panel session explored topics ranging from dealing with underperforming veteran F&I managers, strategies for facilitating collaboration between the sales department and F&I, and how agents can ensure their efforts are recognized by dealers. ”Communication,” urged panelists, “is key.”

After a lunch that rivaled any Vegas hot spot, names were drawn for two $500 gift cards, courtesy of Old Republic Insured Automotive Services, and two weeklong deep-sea fishing trips, thanks to Performance Automotive Management. The lucky recipients of the gift cards were Glen Tuscan, president, Dealer Commitment Services, and Greg Liverett, vice president of marketing, SGI Services. William Kelly, partner, Automotive Development Group, and Anna McMillan, president, The Milby Group, were thrilled to win the fishing trip prizes.

Jim Maxim Jr., president, MaximTrak, showed agents how to use cutting edge technology to set themselves apart from the competition, increase profits and operate more easily and efficiently. In addition to examining today’s technology landscape in industries across the board, he presented innovative technology solutions for agents and explained how they could be integrated into everyday business.

The technology panel session dissected topics ranging from the impact of compliance on menu usage, to data analytics, and the increasingly popular move towards customer driven presentations in F&I. Panel members were in agreement that in any type of business, you can’t manage what you can’t measure.

The day concluded with a drawing for a Surface Pro 3 sponsored by Endurance Dealer Services. Tom Clark, the owner of Prosperity Dealer Services, was named the prizewinner.

Day three of Agent Summit ushered in the second annual agent principal only session, featuring round table discussions during a sponsored breakfast. The new format was informative and engaging with top agents brainstorming solutions for common issues agents face in their day-to-day business operation. Agents entered the room on high alert as they scanned topics by table to decide which one was most relevant to them. After thoughtful collaboration, each table captain shared their group’s recommendations for making the most of the given challenges. Discussion topics included selling in the service drive, provider relations, dealer expectations, effectively managing a remote sales force, staffing, competition and more. As one table captain took the podium, he pointed out the vast amount of wisdom and experience in the room, stating that his table alone represented more than 81 years of collective industry experience.

Show sponsor, ECP, ended the third day by sending several attendees home with new timepieces. Tension filled the room when names were drawn for the recipients of a Tissot Sailing Touch watch, a Luminox Deep Dive watch, and a Rolex Explorer II. Derek Doberstein, account executive, Back End Builders, took home the Tissot; Brian LoBaugh, partner, Auto Group Services pocketed the Luminox; and Mark Swannie, president, Karbiz took home the grand prize Rolex.

At the end of the show, Crisorio shared his thoughts on Agent Summit V with AE, “The feedback I’ve received is scary. We’ve set the bar so high that future Summit planning will be challenging. Nonetheless, I was told over and over again that Agent Summit V was the best industry event EVER! That says it all and is a credit to the industry professionals that left their knowledge and talent on stage.”

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Raiders of the Lost Profit


There are a few ways dealerships lose profit, which they can fix right now. Here’s a look at some of the biggest offenders.

Monday Mornings
It’s the same every week: Monday morning you walk into the office, get your coffee and look at the stack of deals that are piled up on your desk from the weekend. By the end of the day on Saturday and Sunday, everyone just wanted to hurry up and get out of there, so this is how you start every week. The last thing you want to see on a Monday is a customer in the showroom when you have paperwork piled high from the weekend. Thank goodness there are only four Mondays in a month! You have to be more administratively sound so you can handle those deals quicker on Monday mornings, because you have a Monday every week. If we don’t deal with things quickly and efficiently on Mondays, then it can have a trickle-down effect into the rest of the week and can be a big way to lose profit.

CITs
Next we have CITs or Contracts in Transit – in other words, the money is not in the bank yet. And again Monday is just the start of it. CITs are like bananas: they start out nice and ripe, but then they just get riper, and then next thing you know you have to throw them away. It’s the same with CITs – the longer they sit on your desk before they get to the bank, the more the dealership is losing. That’s why at UDS, when we refer to a CIT, we call it a “Cash It Today.” If you can change your thinking on this, and get CITs cashed the same day, that will be one more way you won’t be losing profit.

There are several ways you can cash a contract today: self fund, eContracting, fax funding or overnight enveloping. If you want to get a deal cashed right away, utilize the most up to date processes, and use the checklists in deals. There are always checklists, but no one ever seems to utilize them – they just throw the list in there. That’s like flying without gas in the plane.

In F&I, you should be ironing out the most difficult challenges first. It’s human nature to have a tendency to save the worst for last, but that’s a terrible strategy in F&I because as those deals are waiting, the difficulties are getting worse. You have to go over the worst first, and only once they are handled can you move on to the easy ones. It’s the exact opposite of the way you did things in college when you would do the all the easy problems first on a test and then go back and save the hard ones for last.

Heat sheet meetings are important to ensure everyone is working for the same, common goal: to get the deal funded. This way, everything is not just riding on your shoulders; everyone has the same goal in mind. Depending on the size of the dealership, you should have meetings every day or every other day.

Internet, Credit Unions, Cash and Lease Deals
F&I managers have a tendency to work the deal if the customer is at the dealership, but if the customer is away from the dealership, an Internet or phone deal for example, the F&I manager will tend to take that deal and throw it on their credenza until the customer comes in. Unfortunately, what usually happens next is that when the customer does come in, they come in with pre-approved credit, a check or they may have already done their financing, leaving the F&I manager pretty much locked down. You have to be proactive, not just be reactive. You have to be out in the trenches, every day before you go to work, talking with management teams and sales consultants to find out what’s going on.

F&I has not really embraced the Internet shopper yet. Statistics have proven that in the last couple of years, 80-85% of customers are coming to us from the Internet. As a result, we’ve got to change our mindset. The Internet customer is probably more important to you than the ones on the floor. In fact the Internet customer has expressed an intention to come to you to buy that car, and the problem is we’re not ready to sell it to them. Instead we take them through this whole process and it just bogs them down. We are not Internet-savvy enough in F&I; we have to embrace those transactions. The biggest problem is that we don’t have a process for Internet customers – no one calls them and everyone waits for them to come into the dealership. That’s going to cost you tons of money. Get smart and use the phone, and be ready when they arrive; that’s what they want. Make it a big event when they arrive. You will sell more cars and make more money. It’s the same with credit union, cash and lease deals – we need to embrace those deals too.

We often ask the customers, “What’s the rate?” when we find out they are going to a credit union. Stop asking that question, and instead ask why they are going to the credit union in the first place. If they say it’s because that’s where they do all their business and they are loyal to them, then you’re not going to beat that, but if they say it’s because they are getting a great rate, then you’ve got something to work with. If you just ask them what the rate is, they aren’t going to tell you the truth; they are likely going to tell you they are getting a much lower rate than they actually are getting from the credit union.
Learn to embrace credit union, lease and cash deals the same as you would finance deals; they come with the territory. Remember, everyone faces the same perils of the road whether they are a lease, cash or finance deal. Slow down the deal and allow the process to drive your profits.

Attitude: YOU are the greatest challenge
Your attitude can make money or can displace money. If you have a really good attitude about every deal, then you’re going to make money. If you think you can, you probably will; if you think you can’t, you probably won’t. It’s all about attitude. Look in the mirror and ask yourself, “Am I part of the pitfalls of F&I? Am I a DO-er or a do NOT-er?”

Our attitude is usually dictated by the kind of deal we get in F&I. You have to look at every deal you have as an opportunity whether it’s a finance deal, cash or lease deal. We know that 80% of our money comes from a finance deal. So you have to set your menu up properly; I’ve witnessed F&I managers use the same menu whether it was finance, lease or cash and they will have products on their menu that the customer simply doesn’t qualify for. For example, they will have GAP on a menu where the customer is putting 50% down. Or they will have a service contract for 5 years or 75000 miles on a lease for only 3 years and it makes no sense! You have to tailor the presentation to the type of deal it is as well as the customer’s driving criteria, which you will find out during the introduction.

Lost Opportunities in the Service Drive
A lot of F&I managers are relying on the service managers to do their job for them. It is the F&I manager’s job to hold the service manager accountable to send them referrals. Instead of going in the front door, they should go in the service walk every morning and ask, “Hey, what’s going on? Have you got any deals today? Do you have any customers who are almost out of their factory warranties that I can talk to?” Instead of relying on the service manager to bring you the deal, you need to be proactive.

Mysteriously Appearing Deals, or Dude Where’s My Car?
Form an alliance with the sales staff. Go out and really talk with them and find out what kind of appointments they have going on. You have to have a willingness to manage deals, even if the customer isn’t at the dealership – that is the biggest challenge. Utilize your CRM, Customer Retention Tool. You have to have access to that tool and use it consistently, because it’s the eyes and ears of the sales and sales management staff, in order for you to be proactive and know what’s going on.

Multiple Product Sales
F&I managers don’t really follow a menu process that allows them to get multiple products. Often times they rely on the banks’ call back, and the banks frequently limit their callbacks to the number of products they can sell. They rely on how the deal was structured at the desk, and if the desk cuts them out then they feel that they can’t sell any more products. This is a lost profit opportunity because you can offer every product to every single customer – it’s in the manner in which you do that. Sometimes you may be locked out, but you can tell the customer, “Look, we are making these products available to you. Some of them we can finance and some of them we can’t. If you are interested, then we will find a means to get you into those products.” We should always tell them this because there are all sorts of ways you can do it, such as repayment plans. You can’t allow the call back or the sales desk to dictate your destiny in F&I.

Follow the 300 Rule, which is this: Present 100% of the products to 100% of the customers 100% of the time (assuming they qualify). Every customer must have the opportunity to at least know the products available to them. Consider the ABC’s of F&I: The A is always ask permission. When I was a kid, I was taught to say, “may I.” If you said, “can I,” then the adult would tell you that you couldn’t, but if you were polite they would respond, “Yes, you may.” So you learned to be polite and ask permission. The B is for break down the options. Instead of breaking down products on a menu, or any type of presentation you have, break down the options and narrow the choices. You have four columns on the menu – you might have six or seven products on the first column, that’s six or seven choices. You want to make that so that it’s one option. You break down the options, and therefore you only have four choices that the customer has now, instead of six or seven. C stands for close on the options, don’t close on individual products. When a customer says, “I’ll take GAP; I had it on my last car.” You respond with, “Great, which option would you like it in?” rather than just saying okay.

Utilize a final disclosure. The menu should be used as a disclosure, and the final disclosure should be your waiver. If you look at the F&I menu as a selling tool, then you are looking at it the wrong way. It’s nothing more than a disclosure after you give a presentation.

Finally, tell your story, don’t sell your story! Tell your story as you expose your products on the menu. Sell your story after you’ve exposed all your products on the menu. There’s a difference between a feature and a benefit. The feature is the tell, the benefit is the sell. You want the feature presentation initially, then after you do the feature presentation, you do the benefits presentation. That would be the sell.

Don’t let excuses get in the way of your strengths. The bottom line in avoiding lost profit opportunities is to consistently use effective processes, proper procedures and to always have a positive attitude. A bad attitude is like a flat tire; it will never get you anywhere. Remember these tips and soon you will be busy counting your profits and not thinking about your lost opportunities!

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Top F&I Trainer to Address Process, Hard-to-Get-Done Deals


Las Vegas — Gerry Gould, director of training for United Development Systems (UDS), will return to the 2013 F&I Conference this September to deliver “Raiders of the Lost Profit,” a workshop in which he will reveal areas of lost profit and the steps F&I teams need to take to capture that profit.

Scheduled for 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 17, Gould will show attendees how to construct a proactive F&I process that gets F&I teams involved in deals early and often. The session will look beyond standard finance deals, and will offer insights on how F&I teams can make a positive impact on cash and lease deals, as well as sales that originate online. He will also offer advice on driving a better connection between the F&I office and service.

“Gerry is a dynamic presenter and one of the top F&I minds in our industry,” said Gregory Arroyo, show chair and editorial director for F&I and Showroom magazine. “If you’ve heard him speak or read his articles, you know he’s big on getting F&I managers out from behind their desk and into the action. And with leasing and Internet sales testing tried-and-true F&I processes, that’s exactly what’s needed. So we asked him to help our attendees devise a plan for capturing the full F&I profit potential of all deals.

Last year, attendees of the annual conference voted Gould a “Best in Class” speaker, an honor he shared with F&I trainers Tony Dupaquier, Luis Garcia and Ron Reahard. Gould spent 15 years of his 33-year industry career in retail and became an F&I trainer in 1996.

The F&I Conference is one of three shows being hosted at Industry Summit 2013, which is being held at the Paris Las Vegas hotel Sept. 16-18. For more information, visit www.industrysummit.com.

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As Leasing Grows, So Does F&I Opportunity


In a report released this past summer, Experian Automotive noted that new vehicle leasing had risen by 12.5 percent this year to date – it hit a record high since the firm started keeping track of the statistic in 2006. According to the report, leasing now accounts for as much as 27.5 percent of new vehicle financing in the first quarter of 2013, up from 24.4 percent in the same quarter in 2012.

At the same time, the report noted that lease payments were down – at an average of $459, down from $462 in 2012. That comes with longer loan terms for lease deals – 65 months in the first quarter of this year.

For dealers and agents, these numbers represent an opportunity. While there have always been successful exceptions, the majority of dealerships tend to focus their F&I efforts on finance deals, with leasing customers getting little-to-no attention. But these numbers demonstrate that lease customers are a large and growing segment of the population, and contrary to popularly held beliefs, F&I products are as relevant to them as to the finance customer.

“Leasing has certainly grown and continues to grow every month,” said Brian Crisorio, vice president, United Development Systems (UDS). “Some stores are going from one a month to 12 or more; in some stores leasing is just huge. Sure there are a couple of makes or models not as focused on leasing, but it seems like across the board everyone is in the leasing game.”

What products should dealers be focused on? The consensus was that many F&I products have a place in a lease deal. John Vecchioni, national sales director, United Car Care, noted that any wear and tear product is a good fit for a lease, as is any interior/exterior protection plan, key replacement or tire and wheel. He also noted, surprisingly, that GAP is a potential lease product as well.

Tony Dupaquier, director of F&I training, American Financial and Automotive Services, also put GAP at the top of his list. “Not all leases have GAP,” he noted, “that’s one of the things everyone keeps forgetting. You have to pay attention and make sure the lease has GAP in it, and if not, sell GAP. Most leases do have GAP in them, it’s built into the lease, but you sporadically find leases that do not come with GAP, and the business managers don’t even know it. They have to make sure GAP is included, and if not, sell GAP.”

Wear and tear or appearance protection plans – both interior, with chemical protection, and exterior with dent and ding – and tire and wheel, were the top ancillary products all three agreed that F&I managers need to be presenting to every lease customer.

“Any appearance product is typically a good one for the lease customer,” noted Crisorio. “Protecting the exterior finish as well as the interior from rips, tears and burns keeps the vehicle looking great. Paintless dent repair does much of the same thing – if it’s turned in with dents and dings, they get a bill. Keys are getting more expensive every year, so key replacement is becoming more important – a damaged or missing key when you turn in the car will be expensive. And tire and wheel is also a big one.”

Vecchioni noted that he sees more products being sold into leases as a bundle, rather than individually. “Bundling saves time, and that savings allows you to capitalize on features and benefits of the products along with the impact it brings that particular customer. Wear and tear protection along with an appearance package go together. You can bundle almost any product, just keep in mind they have to have some similar advantages that make sense.”

“A case could be made that there’s an advantage to selling a multi product versus selling individual products,” said Crisorio. “A lot of it depends on the approach of the F&I manager – train on the process regardless of the deal. Focus on options, rather than individual products, and give them the best protection for that customer.”

Dupaquier noted that he teaches his F&I managers to always start off with the lease products in a bundle. “If customer doesn’t want a package for whatever reason, they’ll typically go back and pick up an individual item,” he said, “so start with all of them packaged together. The most successful F&I departments I’m seeing, they’ll put together a lease package that will have all of them.”

The exceptions to the bundling rule seem to be two: prepaid maintenance and key replacement. All three agreed that those are great lease products, but are easier to sell as stand-alone products. It is harder, they noted, to build value for maintenance or key replacement. Dupaquier noted that in many cases, customers argue that they’ve never lost a key, so they don’t see the value in key replacement, and he sees prepaid maintenance as more of a customer retention tool than anything else. The trick on that, at least, is to price it effectively.

“A lot of business managers go with scheduled maintenance as their number one hit,” Dupaquier noted. “The only cautionary piece is your price point on it – on a lease, the product price is divided by the term of the lease, unlike a traditional finance deal, which is divided by 72+ months in some cases. So scheduled maintenance that is $400-$500 changes the lease price by such an amount of money it turns people off. When a dealership tries to make too much money on it, the customer goes away, since they can go get the services done cheaper elsewhere. And on the lease, the likelihood is that the customer is coming back to that dealership anyway because of the lease, so you have built in customer retention. So dealers should put the focus on the ancillary products, for the items customers are responsible for.”

At the end of the day, selling products into a lease deal should be no different than selling them into a financed deal. Other than specific objections that might come up, the approach should be exactly the same.

“The training for handling a lease customer is similar to training for a traditional finance deal or cash deal,” said Crisorio. “Much of our training is process related, and doesn’t change if the product does. Only some of the word tracks might change to fit that customer. The approach is identical. The important part is to build value in the products you’re presenting.”

“I would explain the conditions of the lease,” Dupaquier noted, “as part of the way they start off conversation. Make sure the customer is aware of their requirements as far as vehicle condition is concerned – the same type of disclosure as how many miles the vehicle can have. Things like windshield has to be 100 percent; any door dings they’re responsible for; no mismatched tires –they have to make sure they have four of the same; any paint fading or interior staining they’re responsible for, etc. So educate them on that, then it’s easy to generate demand for the product. Don’t approach it any different; work it similar to a finance deal, with the same basic approach.”

Vecchioni summed it up with a few tips for agents to bring back to their dealers. “1. Present every product to your customers; wear and tear products, appearance products, key replacement, and tire and wheel protection are products that make sense. 2. Ensure every regulation is complied with, going over every lease agreement and the customer’s obligation to the lease – it helps set up product.”

At the end of the day, all the forecasts show leasing as increasing in the near future, with more customers seeing it as a solid financial alternative to financing, especially with so many people taking credit hits in the last few years. Agents should be stressing the importance of those lease customers to their dealers, as it is a trend that isn’t going away any time soon, and it’s a profit opportunity that shouldn’t be missed. “Agents should embrace leasing as additional opportunities that earn money,” said Crisorio. “They have to support the dealer, and support the trends in the industry. There is nothing an agent can do to stop it, so embrace it, support it, and be a true partner to your dealer and help them in any way you can.”

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