Tag Archive | "ignition switch"

General Motors Issues Three New Recalls, Cites Ignition Systems


General Motors Co began the new year by announcing three new vehicle recalls on Thursday, as the ignition switch crisis continued to dog the automaker after millions of vehicles were recalled in 2014, reported Reuters.

No crashes or injuries were reported in the latest round of recalls involving 83,572 sport-utility vehicles and pickup trucks. GM expects that fewer than 500 will be affected by the defect, an ignition lock actuator with an outer diameter that exceeds specifications.

Still, the issue could spook consumers and investors.

Ignition system problems were behind the record number of recalls made in 2014 by GM, which has struggled to rebuild its reputation following its 2009 bankruptcy.

The recalls hit GM’s share price, which fell 14.6 percent during 2014, a year in which shares of rival Ford Motor Co rose about 0.5 percent.

GM recalled more than 2.5 million vehicles in 2014 after accidents that caused more than 40 deaths. The compensation program, which is accepting claims until Jan. 31, has received more than 2,200 claims for injuries and deaths as a result of the issue.

In the primary recall announced on Thursday, the outsized ignition lock actuator can lead to the ignition key getting stuck in the “start” position. If the vehicle is driven that way and experiences a “significant jarring event,” the ignition lock cylinder could move into the “accessory” position, affecting engine power, power steering and power braking.

“Also, the timing of the key movement into the accessory position relative to crash sensing could result in the air bags not deploying in certain crashes,” company spokesperson Alan Alder said in a statement.

The latest issue was discovered in an internal review following warranty party returns, GM said, and covers certain Chevrolet Silverado light-duty and heavy-duty pickups, as well as Avalanche, Tahoe and Suburban; GMC Sierra light duty and heavy-duty pickups, and Yukon and Yukon XL; Cadillac Escalade, Escalade ESV and Escalade EXT. It concerns models from 2011 and 2012, and 2007-2014 vehicles that have been repaired with defective parts.

Another of the announced recalls concerns a faulty hose clamp in 56 Chevrolet Silverado HD and GMC Sierra HD pickup trucks from the 2015 model year.

The third covers 152 of the 2015 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC 1500 pickup trucks over concerns the rear axle shaft could fracture while the vehicles were being driven.

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Approved Death Claims Related to GM Ignition Switch Recall Rise to 42


DETROIT – The number of approved death compensation claims related to a recall of a faulty General Motors ignition switch has risen to 42, reported MLive.

The claims were approved by a fund set up by GM to compensate victims of a defective part in mid-to-late-2000s model cars that has led to a massive recall and a federal investigation. The number of approved claims stood at 19 in mid-September and had grown steadily to 36 at the beginning of December.

The victim compensation fund is being overseen by Kenneth Feinberg, a Washington, D.C. attorney who oversaw similar compensation facilities for disasters such as the BP Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The GM ignition switch claims facility released its latest report Friday.

The latest tally of claims received stands at 2,326, including 251 death claims, 156 “Category One” injury claims, or those resulting in quadriplegia, paraplegia, double amputation, permanent brain damage or pervasive burns, and 1,919 “Category Two” injury claims, or injuries that required a hospital visit within 48 hours of an accident.

To date, there have been 100 claims determined eligible, including the 42 death claims, as well as seven Category One injury claims and 51 Category Two claims.

The deadline for filing a compensation claim has been extended to Jan. 31.

According to the claims resolution facility’s program statistics, 306 claims have been deemed ineligible, while 568 are deficient and 445 are under review. Another 907 claims have been submitted with no documentation. Of those, 46 are death claims, 46 are Category One claims and 815 are Category Two.

GM has estimated that compensating all victims of the defective car part could cost the Detroit automaker anywhere from $400-600 million.

GM has recalled 2.6 million vehicles, including 2.2 million in the U.S., affected by the ignition switch. The recall includes 2003-2007 Saturn Ions, 2007-2010 Saturn Skys, 2005-2011 Chevrolet HHRs, 2006-2010 Pontiac Solstices, and 2005-10 Chevrolet Cobalt and Pontiac G5 models.

The faulty ignition switches at the heart of the unprecedented recall can move out of the “run” position to the “accessory” or “off” positions, leading to a loss of power. The risk may be increased if the key ring is carrying added weight or if the vehicle goes off road or experiences some jarring event, including rough roads. If the key turns to one of those positions, officials say the front air bags may not work if there’s a crash.

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NHTSA Urging GM Vehicle Owners to Get Faulty Ignition Switches Fixed


The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Tuesday that General Motors now has enough parts to fix faulty ignition switches in mid-2000s model cars tied to a massive and deadly recall, reported MLive.

So the federal agency is urging owners of the affected cars to get the 1 million or so cars with the faulty ignition switches in them to get them fixed immediately.

Many GM dealers will help owners fix the vehicles after work and on weekends.

“Until the affected vehicle is fixed, owners should follow all of the interim safety steps advised by GM and keep in mind that the use of a single key is not a long term solution to the this serious safety problem,” NHTSA said Tuesday in a statement.

GM has recalled 2.6 million vehicles, including 2.2 million in the U.S., affected by the ignition switch. The recall includes 2003-2007 Saturn Ions, 2007-2010 Saturn Skys, 2005-2011 Chevrolet HHRs, 2006-2010 Pontiac Solstices, and 2005-10 Chevrolet Cobalt and Pontiac G5 models.

The faulty ignition switches at the heart of the unprecedented recall can move out of the “run” position to the “accessory” or “off” positions, leading to a loss of power. The risk may be increased if the key ring is carrying added weight or if the vehicle goes off road or experiences some jarring event, including rough roads. If the key turns to one of those positions, officials say the front air bags may not work if there’s a crash.

Thus far, GM has repaired almost 60 percent of the affected cars under the recall.

Meanwhile, he number of approved death compensation claims related to the recall has edged up to 36.

The claims were approved by a fund set up by GM to compensate victims of a defective part in mid-to-late-2000s model cars that has led to a massive recall and a federal investigation. The number of approved claims stood at 19 in mid-September and had grown steadily to 35 last month.

The victim compensation fund is being overseen by Kenneth Feinberg, a Washington, D.C. attorney who oversaw similar compensation facilities for disasters such as the BP Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The GM ignition switch claims facility released its latest report Monday.

The deadline for filing a compensation claim has been extended to Jan. 31.

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Approved Death Claims Related to GM Ignition Switch Recall Rise to 36


The number of approved death compensation claims related to a recall of a faulty General Motors ignition switch has edged up to 36, reported MLive.

The claims were approved by a fund set up by GM to compensate victims of a defective part in mid-to-late-2000s model cars that has led to a massive recall and a federal investigation. The number of approved claims stood at 19 in mid-September and had grown steadily to 35 last month.

The victim compensation fund is being overseen by Kenneth Feinberg, a Washington, D.C. attorney who oversaw similar compensation facilities for disasters such as the BP Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The GM ignition switch claims facility released its latest report Monday.

The latest tally of claims received stands at 2,215, including 229 death claims, 142 “Category One” injury claims, or those resulting in quadriplegia, paraplegia, double amputation, permanent brain damage or pervasive burns, and 1,844 “Category Two” injury claims, or injuries that required a hospital visit within 48 hours of an accident.

To date, there have been 80 claims determined eligible, including the 36 death claims, as well as five Category One injury claims and 39 Category Two claims.

The deadline for filing a compensation claim has been extended to Jan. 31.

According to the claims resolution facility’s program statistics, 216 claims have been deemed ineligible, while 463 are deficient and 375 are under review. Another 1,081 claims have been submitted with no documentation. Of those, 51 are death claims, 44 are Category One claims and 986 are Category Two.

GM has estimated that compensating all victims of the defective car part could cost the Detroit automaker anywhere from $400-600 million.

GM has recalled 2.6 million vehicles, including 2.2 million in the U.S., affected by the ignition switch. The recall includes 2003-2007 Saturn Ions, 2007-2010 Saturn Skys, 2005-2011 Chevrolet HHRs, 2006-2010 Pontiac Solstices, and 2005-10 Chevrolet Cobalt and Pontiac G5 models.

The faulty ignition switches at the heart of the unprecedented recall can move out of the “run” position to the “accessory” or “off” positions, leading to a loss of power. The risk may be increased if the key ring is carrying added weight or if the vehicle goes off road or experiences some jarring event, including rough roads. If the key turns to one of those positions, officials say the front air bags may not work if there’s a crash.

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Two More Deaths Identified by GM Ignition-Switch Program


Two additional deaths have been attributed to a faulty ignition switch in General Motors Co vehicles, bringing the total to 35, according a report on Monday from the lawyer overseeing a program to compensate for deaths and accidents linked to the part, reported Reuters.

As of Friday, the program, which began accepting claims on Aug. 1, had received 2,180 claims for injuries and deaths, an increase of more than 3 percent from a week earlier, according to the report from the office of lawyer Kenneth Feinberg.

Overall, the fund has received 225 claims for deaths, 139 for catastrophic injuries and 1,816 for less-serious injuries requiring hospitalization. Of those, claims from 35 deaths, five severe injuries and 39 other injuries have been deemed eligible for the program.

The report said 215 claims were deemed ineligible, while 455 claims lacked sufficient paperwork or evidence and nearly half – 1,076 – had no documentation at all.

GM has hired Feinberg, who ran high-profile victim compensation funds for the Sept. 11 attacks and Deepwater Horizon oil spill, to handle an out-of-court compensation program to pay claims on behalf of people injured or killed because of the switch.

The part, which can slip out of position and cut power to critical vehicle systems, prompted the recall of 2.6 million vehicles earlier this year.

The original deadline for claims submissions was Dec. 31, but GM recently agreed to extend that to Jan. 31.

GM has said it gave Feinberg free rein to determine who to compensate and would not challenge his decisions.

Eligible death claimants can receive more than $1 million. The amount of compensation has not been capped, and GM has set aside at least $400 million to cover its costs.

Shares of GM were up 0.2 percent at $32.19 in morning trading.

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Former GM Engineer Defends Role with Defective ‘Switch from Hell’


In his first public comments since parting with the automaker, former General Motors engineer Raymond DeGiorgio defended his role to the New York Times in what he referred to in internal documents as the “switch from hell,” according to MLive.

He’s referencing a defective ignition switch found in smaller-model GM cars that has been linked to at least 32 deaths, prompted a recall of 2.6 million vehicles and cost GM billions of dollars.

DeGiorgio has been at the center of blame for the disastrous part, and when a New York Times reporter caught up with him at his suburban Detroit home he reportedly became emotional:

“Asked about the dozens of people who were killed and injured because of a faulty ignition switch that he was responsible for, Mr. DeGiorgio, 61, broke down and cried.

‘It’s very emotional,’ he said. ‘I’m getting very emotional about it right now.’
Yet at the same time he was defensive and defiant. ‘All I can say is that I did my job,’ he said. ‘I didn’t lie, cheat or steal. I did my job the best I could.’”

DeGiorgio was fired with 14 other employees in June. At the time, GM CEO Mary Barra said the names of the dismissed workers would not be made public, but she did confirm that DeGiorgio and fellow engineer Gary Altman – both of whom had previously been put on paid leave – were no longer with the company.

The New York Times’ review of internal documents reveals that DeGiorgio expressed concern to high-level committees at GM, but these concerns were rebuffed. DeGiorgio first approved the part in 2001, but then later found the ignition switch to be flawed, and in ensuing months he expressed as much to GM colleagues and Delphi employees, according to the New York Times report.

However, DeGiorgio is blamed for failing to change the part number of new switches he unilaterally ordered from Delphi in 2006, making it harder for GM to understand why earlier Chevrolet Cobalts had higher failure rates than models made after 2006, according to the report.

GM has recalled 2.6 million vehicles, including 2.2 million in the U.S., affected by the ignition switch. The recall includes 2003-2007 Saturn Ions, 2007-2010 Saturn Skys, 2005-2011 Chevrolet HHRs, 2006-2010 Pontiac Solstices, and 2005-10 Chevrolet Cobalt and Pontiac G5 models.

The faulty ignition switches at the heart of the unprecedented recall can move out of the “run” position to the “accessory” or “off” positions, leading to a loss of power. The risk may be increased if the key ring is carrying added weight or if the vehicle goes off road or experiences some jarring event, including rough roads. If the key turns to one of those positions, officials say the front air bags may not work if there’s a crash.

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